Posts tagged: inflammation

Gum Disease May Mean More Than Just Bad Breath

According to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention1, 43% of Americans will have lost at least six teeth by the age of 65, and many of these teeth will have been lost due to periodontal disease. Another 18% have lost all their teeth. While this statistic is extremely grim, periodontal disease has much wider implications for overall health, and one of the earliest signs of periodontal disease can be persistent bad breath.

Although it’s upsetting to have bad breath, it is one of the mildest side-effects of gum disease. Gum disease is a potentially serious condition, and clinical studies have shown that gum disease, or periodontal disease, generally develops as a result of poor oral hygiene. Japan’s Kyushu Dental College2 has done extensive research into the causes of bad breath, and has identified the microbes responsible for causing this somewhat antisocial condition.

They examined 101 adult volunteers, some of whom were suffering from periodontal disease while others had healthy mouths. By analyzing saliva samples from the group, the research team was able to identify species of a microbe called Bacteroides forsythus, which is normally found deep under the gum line in cases of advanced periodontal disease. This microbe is strongly correlated with bad breath. While this is interesting, it’s important to remember that poor oral health can have far more serious ramifications for your overall health. Read more »

Cavity-Causing Bacteria Linked To Endocarditis

We have long ago heard that gum disease may be linked to heart disease, but now due to recent discoveries made at the University of Rochester, there is even more evidence to shed light on why and how our oral health may affect the heart.

Thanks to the investigative work of Jacqueline Abranches, Ph.D. and her team at the University of Rochester’s Center for Oral Biology, we can now better understand why the cavity-inducing bacteria called Streptococcus mutans may be a leading cause of endocarditis, the potentially deadly inflammation of the heart valves. Infectious endocarditis can result in the destruction of heart valves and cardiac muscle, leading to “leaky heart valves” and heart failure.  Untreated or undertreated endocarditis is often fatal.

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Periowave™ Case Study- Gingival Inflammation and Pain Due to Oral Lichen Planus

Case Report

This is the case of a 72-year-old Caucasian woman who presented with a complaint of gingival pain on 11 and 21 during eating and brushing. She had no significant medical history (Figure 1.1). She described discomfort from 11, 21 for the previous six months. Incisional biopsies were performed, and immunofluorescence suggested oral lichen planus. Since there is no cure for OLP, attempts were made to treat the symptoms with Lidex® and later tacrolimus, though these measures provided no relief.

PeriowaveTM Treatment and Results

The patient underwent one treatment session with PeriowaveTM. Within one week following PeriowaveTM therapy, the gingival inflammation had resolved (Figure 1.2) and the patient experienced complete relief from the presenting complaint of pain.

Figure 1.1 – Pre-treatment gingival inflammation due to OLP Figure 1.2 – Post-treatment resolution of gingival inflammation

Gum Disease And Its Link To Rheumatoid Arthritis

Research is increasingly pointing towards a link between the two conditions. We’ve blogged about gum disease and its link to stroke, breast cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and even pre-term births, let’s look at rheumatoid arthritis. More than 1.3 million Americans suffer from this condition, and it’s been discovered by German researchers in Berlin, that patients with this condition can have a higher prevalence of periodontal disease. In fact a study of 57 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 52 healthy controls discovered that people with this condition are nearly eight times as likely to have periodontal disease1.

The study determined the oral health of rheumatoid arthritis patients and the healthy controls, and took into account demographic and lifestyle characteristics such as gender, age and tobacco use. It’s been found that treating periodontal disease can lessen the degree of arthritic pain and stiffness in sufferers.

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Periowave™ Case Study #3 – Unsuccessful Prior Periodontal Therapy

Case Report
This is the case of a 52-year-old East Indian female who was on regular four-month maintenance following previous periodontal therapy. The patient had been treated three years prior for generalized severe periodontitis. The treatment at that time consisted of scaling and root planing, home care instructions, occlusal equilibration, and osseous surgery. The patient was in generally good health apart from high blood pressure, which was stable on lisinopril (Prinivil®) once a day. The dental examination showed a 6 mm inflamed bleeding pocket that was evident between 43 and 42 the rest of the mouth was healthy.

Periowave™ Treatment and Results

Scaling and root planing with local anesthesia was used to treat 43 and 42, with adjunctive treatment with Periowave following the scaling. The patient was out of the country after treatment for several months, but did return for a 12-week follow-up visit, at which time the pocket probing depth was reduced to 3 mm with no signs of inflammation

Left: Pre-treatment gingival inflammation near the pocket, Right: Post-treatment resolution of gingival inflammation

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