New Study Shows Normal Bacteria Could Be Catalyst for Gum Disease

New research conducted by Queen Mary University of London has given an interesting insight into the way normal bacteria affect the development of gum disease, and could lead to new preventative measures being developed through manipulating these bacteria to help protect the gums.

The study was conducted on mice living in two separate test conditions. One set of mice had normal bacteria in their mouths, while the other mice were raised to be free from bacteria. Small amounts of Porphyromonas gingivalis, a bacteria commonly found in the oral cavity, was introduced to both sets of mice. The mice with normal bacteria in their mouths subsequently developed periodontal bone loss, while those who had previously had bacteria free mouths remained free of the disease.

Scientists found that the presence of P. gingivalis stimulated the growth of normal bacteria, which had a major effect on the inflammatory and immune system of the mice. It appears that even a small amount of P. gingivalis can have an almost disproportionate influence on the severity of gum disease that develops. It now seems that periodontal disease develops when P. gingivalis interacts with existing bacteria, and that these existing bacteria are needed for this to occur. Read More

Dr. Oz Discusses How Oral Health Affects Your Overall Health

There is substantial evidence to support the link between gum disease and serious health conditions, such as heart attack, stroke and rheumatoid arthritis. Now, the mainstream media is taking on this issue too.  In the below interview, Dr. Oz discusses how brushing your teeth daily may help prevent you from developing a heart attack.

Dr. Oz’s interview only reiterates what research has long suggested – your oral health is important to your overall health. Studies conducted in Great Britain, Canada, United States, Germany and Sweden have found people suffering from periodontitis have between a 25% and 100% increased risk of suffering from heart attacks. Other clinical studies suggest a link between periodontitis and the development of strokes. In this video, Dr. Oz discusses how bacteria from the mouth can enter the bloodstream, triggering the clumping of platelets that form blood clots, and increasing your risk of thrombosis. These blood clots can either block blood vessels supplying the heart, creating the right conditions for a heart attack, or they can block the arteries supplying blood to the brain, increasing the risk of a stroke. Periodontal disease has also been linked to other serious conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis. Treatment for this disease has been found to not only improve oral health but to also have a beneficial effect on rheumatoid arthritis.

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