Gum Disease And Its Link To Diabetes

Diabetic patient testing their blood sugar levels

Diabetes is a lifelong disease affecting 285 million people worldwide. In our previous blog post, we explored gum disease and its link to preterm births. Now, let’s look at gum disease and its link to diabetes.

Although people with diabetes are known to be at increased risk of gum disease, it has been unclear which of these diseases comes first. Many studies have shown that treating gum disease can help reduce the risk of developing diabetes1. Alternatively, other studies have suggested that the reverse may also be true2. Either way you look at it, the latest research suggests that diabetics must become more aware of the role gum disease plays in their overall health and be more proactive in improving both. Read More

GUM DISEASE & ITS LINK TO PRE-TERM BIRTHS

Pregnant women with severe gum disease can be 7.5x more likely to give birth prematurely

In our last blog post, we discussed gum disease and its systemic effects on whole body health. Over the past few years, an increasing number of studies have shown the association between gum disease and the adverse outcomes in pregnancy. Some studies have shown that having gum disease places a pregnant woman at higher risk of having a pre-term birth than smoking or consuming alcohol1. Other studies have shown that pregnant women with severe gum disease are 7.5x more likely to have a baby that is born too early and too small2. Preterm births are considered a major risk factor as well as cost factor

Earlier this year, both Business Week & BBC News ran articles linking gum disease to pre-term births. Read More

Gum Disease And The Oral Systemic Link

“Periodontal disease has been linked to rheumatoid arthritis, pre-term birth, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, stroke and even cancer.” 

Healthy (Left) vs. Gum Disease (Right)

I see lines written just like this all the time. For someone who has been actively involved in the dental industry, a line like that is pretty easy to digest, but I know a good many people who would stop reading after the word periodontal.  It can be a bit jarring to remember that not everyone understands the oral systemic link, so I want to explain it in a way that makes sense. 

Periodontal disease, also known as gum disease, is an infection of the gums that is caused by a select group of bacteria, Read More

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